art-sanctuary:

gvmma:

cinoh:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via

Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.

The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

Dream house / imagine turning one floor into a giant studio with paper and books and pencils everywhere.  

oh my oh my oh my oh my 

freshprinceofbeleriand:

i-ship-you-and-me-because-i:

freshprinceofbeleriand:

isn’t it weird to think that you might be drinking the water that someone drowned in and that you might be breathing in the same air that last left a dying person’s lungs and that gift you gave someone that was wrapped in recycled paper might have been someone’s suicide note and that the box jellyfish has 64 anuses 

isn’t that weird to think about

what 

i know it’s so weird to think about

"Imagine; I used to have really long blonde hair, always wearing heels, lots of make-up. I had been someone who was highly feminised and had chosen to look that way, partly because I was 6ft 3in but also I was into that aesthetic. I knew it had to be stripped away. I knew this would be an important part, not just for my work but in terms of my own development, because I would be confronting elements of myself that I didn’t want to confront (…) To see yourself displayed as unattractive, large, masculine, it’s quite tough… But I know it’s just perspective. A social conditioning that causes us to view these traits in a woman in a negative way." — Gwendoline Christie